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West Coast Wilderness: Rob Blakers portfolio

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The further west that one travels in Tasmania the wilder it becomes. There is, in
the tangled forests, wild rocky coastlines, tumultuous rivers, wild coastlines and
untracked ranges an ever-present sense of rawness and untamedness. Being open
to the full force of the Roaring Forties, rain and storm prevail. From Cape Grim in the
far north, to rugged Southwest Cape, Australia's wildest seas crash upon a coastline
which is largely devoid of human habitation. Eight to ten metre swells are not uncommon.

Wild weather shapes the landscape. The great wind-blown dunefields of the Tarkine,
the wiry, impenetrable scrub of the shoreline and exposed ranges, the Savage River
rainforests (Australia's largest), and the plethora of tannin streams which flow to the
western sea are all products of a climate of abundant wind and rain. The oldest living
tree in the world thrives here.

And yet the region remains largely unreserved. From the beleagured Tarkine, to the
beautiful granitic Heemskirk coast, then south again from Macquarie Harbour through
the Wanderer wilderness to Low Rocky Point, all is unprotected. Sadly, land tenure is
founded, by and large, upon an assumption of the pre-eminence of forestry and mining
interests. Only in the far south-west, are the intrinsic natural qualities of an incredible
coastline duly recognised. There is dire need for due recognition of the whole.
— Rob Blakers

Rob's photographs were scanned by Photoforce
©2004 Rob Blakers