: : : TASMANIAN STORY

 

A new gateway
for Hobart

Graceful though the ABC’s sandstone frontispiece building in Hobart is, it is simply a facade, joined to a modern, somewhat soulless modern building.

The sad joke is that this, one of the newest of the national broadcaster’s conglomerate of buildings, was sited so that the north aspect — source of light and welcome winter sunshine — is taken up by the carpark, and most of the offices face the south and west. Cold in winter, hot on a late summer’s afternoon and the lights must be on all day.

However, it is the carpark that we can now announce will have a new entity, and a new vibrancy. Already the dirt piles mark the beginnings of a number of coordinated buildings which will make up the Bahá'í Centre of Learning for Tasmania.

it is also notable in Tasmania (and probably Australia) for being environmentally advanced, usisg non-polluting materials and the latest technologies to save power and water

Important as this is for adherents of the religion founded in Persia in the 19th century, emphasising the essential oneness of humankind and of all religions and seeking world peace (with many followers today throughout the world), it is also notable in Tasmania (and probably Australia) for being environmentally advanced, using non-polluting materials and the latest technologies to save power and water.

Bahá'í believes in inter-relationships. Between humankind and the environment. Between the global picture and local initiatives.

“We cannot segregate the human heart from the environment outside us. Man is organic with the world. His inner life moulds the environment and is itself deeply affected by it” are words from Baha’ullah, which his followers find have a great deal of contemporary relevance.

… the Bahá'í organisation looked for a design that would be in tune with nature, would not impose upon its setting but add a welcoming note to travellers driving into Hobart …

When it came time to plan for a Centre of Learning, to be sited on what was when purchased a section of the ABC carpark, the Bahá'í organisation looked for a design that would be in tune with nature, would not impose upon its setting but add a welcoming note to travellers driving into Hobart, and would also provide for the city much needed meeting spaces catering for smaller groups or conferences.

A family-friendly, community-friendly, eco-friendly series of buildings that were designed by Stuart McKenzie Hall, Kelvin Dennis and Sohale Aftlooni.

The technicalities are impressive:

As it all grows, Leatherwood Online will keep you in touch with progress.¶